Tag Archives: typography

homelessfonts.org

How clever is this? This is a beautiful and moving piece of work for the homeless in Spain, turning their handwriting typically only used to write on cardboard for donations, into new fonts that can be bought online by brands and agencies around the world. The film speaks for itself, and you can buy the fonts here.

The funds collected through the website will be used to finance the work of Arrels Foundation for the homeless people in Barcelona.

Sacred Grounds is good

Sacred Grounds Organic Fairtrade coffee have launched a very cool campaign promoting their ‘good’ coffee. The concept is based around the idea that Sacred Grounds coffee is good, “so you don’t have to be”. The campaign uses a mix of clever copywriting with beautiful typography to produce a seductive and humorous outcome.

The success of this campaign (by The Campaign Palace) is largely due to Sacred Grounds taking a risk. Instead of sticking to safe, monotonous messages about the good qualities of fair-trade, they’ve added a risqué twist that adds fun and gives depth to the brand. They’ve even got away with using the word ‘be-atch’!

Love it?

Yours in ads,

Anya

 

Type cast

All designers love type, so for some inspiration I thought I’d share some amazing typographic ‘shadow art’. These pieces are from a range of artists who cleverly cast light onto their sculptures to create amazing shadow effects (in these cases they form words). Enjoy!

Belgian artist Fred Eerdekens:

Shadow Artist Kumi Yamashita:

Graphic artist Áron Jancsó:

Shadow sculpter Tobias Rehberger:

Yours in typography,

Anya

Heaven Devoid of Stars

It’s just about impossible to imagine a world without movable type. That very sentiment is set in ink in this new print collaboration with Stefan Hattenbach. An extravagant screen-print of gold, white, and black inks on beautiful red Plike paper.

I couldn’t think of a better Christmas gift for myself….ahhh, I mean your loved one.

Buy it here at ilovetypography.com

Yours in typography,
Tanya

The handlettered logo

Somewhere on my travels around the internet last week I stumbled upon this website showcasing the hand-lettered logos from now defunct US department store chains.

I adore the modern script that you can imagine being in the 50s and 60s and not out of place on the next series of Mad Men.

GOLDSMITH’S Memphis, TN. (1946) Founded in 1870, converted to Macy’s in 2005. The logo was designed by Margaret Grace, an employee of the store’s advertising department at the time. The script logo was used in all signage and advertising until the mid-90s, when an all-lower case sans serif font was used.

SAGE ALLEN Hartford, CT. (1970s)
DIAMOND’S Cleveland, OH. Founded in 1860, converted to Dillard’s in 1992.
McALPIN’S Cincinnati, OH Founded in 1852 as Ellis, McAlpin & Co. All McAlpin’s stores were converted to the Dillard’s in 1998.

(Images via Annyas)

Yours in logos,

Justine.

A manifesto for business

Clare Lancaster’s manifesto may be labeled as a manifesto for “Women in Business”, but it really is applicable for everyone in business and everyday life.

 

Clare says: “It’s a collection of words to live by for women who want to make their own path.”

You can download your copy to use as a desktop or to print out to place on your wall for daily inspiration here. If you like this design by Clare she is also about to launch stevie and three, where you will be able to order customisable typographic posters online that will be designed, made to order and printed in London (where Clare now lives). Visit Stevie & Three to be kept up to date on the launch.

What are your words to do business by? What drives you each day?

Yours in words to live by,

Justine.

For the Typography Lovers!

 

a-type-chair

Who needs a Gas lift, reclining, Ergonomic, posturepedic, support chair when you have these AWESOME Typography Chairs! Spell your name, your initials, and you could even play a sneaky game of ABC Musical Chairs!

Furniture inspired by typography is another trend that the Dutch showed to the world late last year. ABChairs is a series of 26 typographic chairs that were presented during Dutch Design week, 2010. 
It’s an alphabet to sit on and a series of chairs to form words with. Designed by graphic designer Roeland Otten, he described himself as “working with a conceptual approach in different fields of art and design, from graphic design to new media and video, from product design to art in public space and events”.

Thanks to using of rotational moulding of LDPE plastic during their manufacture these chairs are quite lightweight, fragile and sustainable for outdoors use. At the moment these chairs can be bought only by request. Smaller size ABChairs for kids would also be available very soon. Keep a lookout online or email him on him@roelandotten.com to find out more!

a-z-type-chair

 

Yours in typography,
Angela Purdy
(on behalf of Amber)

Typographers Dream

fontbook one

fontbook two

“Designers, type enthusiasts and people who love to explore the world of typography, better take a seat before hearing – FontBook, the most complete reference guide of typography in the world, is now available as an App for iPad!”

– Halex Pereira for MacMagazine Brazil (translated from Portuguese)

As if I didn’t need yet another reason to go out and buy myself an iPad (yes I’m proud to say, I am a big Apple fan). When the iPad came out I told myself that I didn’t need one. I felt it was just a glorified iPhone and I already had one of those, but month by month my mind is being changed and now with exciting Apps, like this one on offer from FontBook, I find myself jealous of those who already have one, perhaps it’ll have to be a Christmas present from Santa this year!

This great App delivers 620,000 font specimens – 19 times more than the printed FontBook 4, which only had 32,000. You can use this app to look up and view fonts by typeface name, typeface classification, designer name, foundry name, year or publication, or by similarity of design. This App is like a designers dream, especially those in love with typography. What better tool do you need to flick through and preview thousands and thousands of typefaces.

Check it out or download it for yourself at http://fontbook.com/

Yours in typography,
Dawn

Cleanse and refresh your creative soul

The Dalai Lama is coming to Australia next month, and I managed to score a ticket to see his seminar in Melbourne. I’m really looking forward to dosing my soul in clean, refreshing perspective. So this month, I’m getting ready by cleansing my creative soul, and came across this great blog with some truly beautiful, simple poster designs. To refresh your creative soul, check out some more designs in Francesco Mugnai’s blog.

Yours in refreshed perspective,

Tara

Before I die…

I’ve always driven past billboards/ads/posters and eagerly scanned their content for some form of inspiration to bring to my day. But it seems that beer advertisements with half-naked models, realestate billboards with cheesy agents and towering fast food burgers just aren’t cutting it for me. I can’t help but feel like big businesses have lost the ability to communicate to and understand how the everyday man/woman ticks.

Then I came across this project by Candy Chang in New Orleans. Her public art project invites passers by to chalk their own ending to the sentence: “Before I die I want to…” on a disused building in her neighbourhood. The public are invited to share their most intimate or crazy aspirations, inspiring fellow pedestrians to chalk up.

The opportunity to fully voice your opinion uncensored creates a huge opportunity to be completely honest and think deeply about your answer. This got me wondering that, with all the leaps and bounds in social media, are big brands really connecting with their customers and getting honest feedback? The disconnection with using faceless technology to communicate still creates a barrier. What would happen if companies started using such ‘in-your-face’ approaches as this public art project? Would there be a more honest approach with feedback if both parties are face to face and therefore more accountable for their words? I would personally love to walk into a store or management office and write up on their wall my review of their service (a bit extreme maybe, but boy would I feel like I was being heard!).

It could be a reminder to the bosses on the top floors that the decisions they make effect people, the environment and communities, not just dollars and annual figures. Maybe a utopic idea, what do you think?

Yours in thought,
Tara