Tag Archives: twitter

CMO’s Guide to Social Media Sites

The social-media landscape has grown since last year with an additional 5 more communities/platforms added and a quite a few of  them are already booming. So, which social media tools and channels will work best for your business?

This years largest growing community is Pintrest, which reached 10 million monthly visitors in less time than Facebook or Twitter did. It’s demographics include mostly women and it is quite popular in the Midwest. The concept behind Pintrest is that members can post images of whatever is of interest to them. From there, followers can then ‘like’, or ‘repin’ those images, which is then pushed out to their followers. Pintrest is a bit different as it offers a way to reach a group that is not usually considered a part of the ‘digerati’ and can be most useful for brand exposure and driving traffic to your site if your material gets ‘pinned’ by others.

This year, Google launched Google+, which offers some unique ways to interact, including Circles and Hangouts (group video chats) which make customer communication a breeze. Unlike Facebook ‘Likes’, positive ratings on Google+ can influence your brand’s search ranking. This channel has become a “must have” for social marketers, as it has more than 90 million users (though, there are questions about how active they are).

Three other communities that have recently been added to the social media pool are  SlideShare, Quora and Instagram.

SlideShare is similar to YouTube for slide shows. It is a great way to promote your brand / products and communicate with customers, however it is pretty much a one way conversation at this stage.

Quora was founded by two former Facebooker’s and is based on questions for community members to answer. It’s an ideal place to share your expertise as it is a perfect addition to your content marketing efforts.

Instagram is an iPhone app that lets you take photo’s of your products or services, apply interesting effects and share them, which can also be pushed out to your Facebook page and Twitter.

Is it time for you to re-evaluate which social media tools could work for you? Gone are the days where having a Facebook page is the only option. There is a continuing amount of other channels that have different capabilities and purpose, and used together can connect with a massive amount of people. For an analysis of which social medial tools are the latest and greatest, CMO have, for the third consecutive year, turned to 97th Floor, an SEO and Social Media Firm for their perspective of the different social media channels and ones that could definitely be worth your time.

You can view 97th Floors take on 10 Social Network Choices on 2012 CMO’s Guide To The Social Landscape.

Yours in Social Media

Angie Rapisarda

Will you still Facebook when you’re dead?

ifidie is an app hosted by Facebook that allows you to leave a message that will only be published if you die. You install the app, record a video or write a message, then name three trustees from your Facebook friends. After you die, if all three of your trustees agree, the message will be posted on your wall. The app suggests you can leave a proper farewell, reveal a long-kept secret, or tell someone what you really think of them!

So, handy? Or creepy?

 

 

But wait, it gets creepier… ifidie used Facebook and Twitter check-ins to track where people were at certain points in time, and called them with the ominous message that DEATH CAN COME AT ANY TIME. The creepy all-knowing voice knew where they were and told them they must go to ifidie.com. They called thousands of people and not only did this attract media attention, it actually did increase the traffic to their website.

 

 

Yours in taking things too far,

Anya

 

New social network to rival Facebook, Twitter and Google

I was reading the Brisbane Courier Mail on Friday and came across this story by Alex Dickinson about “the next big” social network, created right here in Brisbane.

Kondoot – a social network based around live streaming video – was quietly launched last month by a small Brisbane team of young technical programmers and already has users from more than 100 countries signed up, with most interest from the US.

It started out as just an idea last year and has taken a little over a year in the making when a few of them got together to see if it was possible. The tight-lipped technical crew has managed to keep it quiet until now.

Mr Hoad, 24, one of the team’s programmers, said Kondoot was a mash-up of the best features of the major social media websites. “Most of them do only their thing – nobody really covers more than that,” he said. “YouTube, for example, is big into video but the social side is not so good. We add that other dimension.”

The team of 10 who work full-time on the site’s business, legal and IT needs is currently working 18-hour days to develop new features.

Users can “friend” others, just like Facebook, but the main point of difference is the wide range of streaming video options.

Kondoot will allow users to broadcast streaming video from home or work live to the world.

“The video calling and text chatting is there and posting to profiles, but we add another dimension,” Kondoot spokesman Nathan Hoad told The Courier-Mail. “It’s mostly about connecting people and video is just one way to do that. “We think we can make a massive splash in the social media scene.”

Will you make the change to Kondoot?

Yours in social media
Angie Rapisarda

Social media in emergencies

Social Media is, by far, one of the most powerful tools on the web. It’s a fast paced way of getting news out to friends, family and the world.

In recent times, we have seen the world victim to a number of natural disasters and other emergencies which have been instantly relayed globally via social media networks. This led me to think about how I would use social media in emergencies.

I did some searching around the net and found this excellent infographic which portrays how social media is used in emergencies.

I find it astonishing that technology that was almost unheard of 10 years ago is now dominating not only our businesses but also our personal lives. For social media to become the vehicle it has, is truly amazing.

Check out the infographic below (courtesy of Credit Loan)

Yours in social media,

Trish

How to make a splash in social media

Making headway in social media can be quite difficult without the right training, direction and information. Let’s face it, there is nothing worse than being given bad information that you pay some ridiculous sum of money for.

Well… as Alexis explains below, sometimes letting people run their course, you end up with something great that came from a simple idea. Trying to persuade people through social media these days is never going to happen. It is kind of like trying to get the entire world saying the same word at the same time. Never going to happen.

Social media is powerful tool and a lot of businesses these days use it to good effect. It really is one of the most important – and free – tools available for marketing your business. Enough of me, take a look at the video below, this funny, ‘rapid-fire’ four minute video explains a campaign that has the weight of the public behind it.

Yours in social media,
Lee

Report: How Australian consumers and businesses use social media

Social media is joining more and more Australian business’s marketing plans, a new report reveals. To date large companies have seen the benefits of engaging in social media, like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn, to develop a more direct and open relationship with their audience. Meanwhile, 14% of small business and 25% of medium businesses currently use social media, and according to figures an uptake in these markets is expected over the next year. This anticipated rise in social media for business use is indicative of business owners and marketers recognsing the benefits of social media and the significant amount of time consumers now spend online (about 5 hours a week on Facebook).

Facebook trumps other social networking sites:

The Sensis report, which explores how Australian consumers and businesses use social media, also revealed that Facebook is the number 1 choice for consumers and businesses. Facebook captures 97% of social networking users and 60% of all internet users.

What consumers want:

This report is a helpful tool for marketers to gain an insight into the consumer’s behaviour within the social sphere. Not surprisingly, when asked what consumers wanted from businesses and brands they followed, discounts was the most commonly sought after item. Giveaways, invitations to events and general product information were also sought by a sizeabe proportion of followers.

Below are some key takeaways from the report:

To access the report in full, click here.

Yours in social media for business,

Julia

Social media at the forefront of news coverage

Proof we don’t do things in halves, the universe threw two of the century’s largest moments into three days – a royal wedding and the takedown of the world’s most wanted terrorist. And proof of the changing ways we communicate in the 21st century, social media was at the forefront of alerting the world.

The pomp and decadence of the Royal Wedding on Friday shone a pretty, romantic light over the world – which let’s admit, has been pretty bleak in 2011 courtesy of Mother Nature’s tragedies. Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Flickr were championing conversation, coverage and updates in the minutes pre, during and post wedding which two billion people stopped to watch.

However, this romance was quite literally killed, overshadowed by the death of Osama bin Laden yesterday. Like the Royal Wedding, social media played a pivotal role in this story, notably in how the news broke.  As reported on Wired, the Osama takedown set the Twitter record, with the micro-blogging site being the avenue where the news was first shared – by a Blackberry.

Personally, I first heard the news of bin Laden’s death at the gym, via Facebook, which led me to research news sites on my iPhone. In fact, the more I think about it, Facebook has been the source of my news and updates through the ups and downs of 2011: the Queensland floods and cyclone, Christchurch’s earthquake, Japan’s tsunami and earthquake, the Royal Wedding coverage … and now bin Laden.

How did you hear about the bin Laden news? And what is your best source of news?

Yours in social media changing the way we communicate,

Julia

The Royal Wedding – a social media affair?

It was reported yesterday that tweets will be banned during Prince William and Kate Middleton’s Royal Wedding ceremony today. That’s right it was alleged signal-blocking technology would be installed at Westminster Abbey, preventing social media leaks by those privy to be up close and personal with the pair. The fears were reportedly about the possibilities of photos, tweets or any sort of exposure reaching the world and news media before the Royal’s official release.

However, Scotland Yard and the Metropolitan Police have denied these twitter-banning claims. Which is a good thing given the entire wedding is being streamed live on YouTube, so us common folk outside the Abbey or in living rooms around the globe will not miss a beat (or tweet, as we’d be out of the signal-blocking technology!).

It’s not news that social media trumps official news casts in speed. Think back to the Queensland floods coverage or the Logies leaks (in 2011, the Logies banned Twitter). With everyone armed with a Smartphone being capable of being a social-journalist, reporting via social media is very real and very now. It’s simply part of the changing ways we communicate.

Within hours, social media channels will be running wild with Royal Wedding banter. Will you be watching the wedding on TV, or will you be online keep tabs on YouTube, while checking Twitter and Facebook? If you’re all for the latter, we recommend reading Mashable’s How to Follow the Royal Wedding Online article.

Yours in royal wedding excitement,

Julia

Benefits of social network integration for websites

Social network integration for your website is a great way to create a connected experience for your target market. Internet users have come to expect sharing functionalities on websites. Clicking a “like” button or a “share” button is easy and instant, allowing the user to share website content to their friends via social networking sites.

The Benefits for your Business
For business owners, social network integration is invaluable for your brand. When a user shares a website link to their social networking site (like Facebook or Twitter), this material is shared to their entire friends /or followers list, opening up potential for more traffic to your website. Statistics show the average Twitter and Facebook user has about 130 followers and friends respectively.

Peers prefer Peers
It’s been reported that audiences today trust the recommendations and brand feedback from their peers more than the company itself – despite companies now entering conversations online via social media. Therefore – like editorial over advertorial – a user sharing your website link to their social networks is highly valuable.

Links are highly shareable
To add further weight to why social network integration is important to your website, consider this: every 20 minutes, 1 million links are shared via Facebook.

So how to you add social media integration to your website?
There are loads of plugins you can source via Google. If you’ve some coding know-how, you can add these to your website. Alternatively, if you want a more strategic approach to your integration that compliments your digital marketing strategy, we’d recommend enlisting a professional agency.

Yours in social networking for business,

Julia

NAB’s social media win: the clever Valentine’s Day tweet

I think I’m in love. No, not because it’s Valentines Day and love is in the air, but because I’ve just seen the whole roll out of the cheeky PR stunt National Australia Bank (NAB) pulled over the weekend as part of its new campaign. A stunt which the bank timed perfectly with Valentines Day, and even had competitor Westpac tweeting in response!

The Twitter stunt very briefly goes like this: @NAB tweets on Friday night – it appears to be that of a “staff member” who had a bad day, and accidentally tweeted their personal message on the NAB profile instead of their own. People commiserate – after all who hasn’t posted something they wish they hadn’t – but the faux pas takes off and is re-tweeted 100+ times, each time growing in momentum and linking people back to the NAB profile. It appears so genuine that even rival bank @Westpac jumps on board and shares in the commiserations – humanising the banking world yet again.

Regardless of how you view the stunt – and there has been wide criticism for its “unprofessional” approach – Friday night’s tweet probably achieved all initial objectives: it humanised the banking world, proving NAB do have a sense of humour; it used social media to generate conversations with potential consumers; and on a more measureable level it increased NAB’s Twitter followers. Combine this with a relatable and memorable tone and perfect, if not unconventional timing and it’s full steam ahead for kickstarting NAB’s cheeky new campaign. (One which could have followed suite of expected and previous bland banking campaigns had they been too afraid to take a risk).

I don’t advocate deceiving the public merely to pull off a campaign, but in the right context and aligned with the perfect mix of media to provide accurate information (and to let the public in on the joke quickly)  social media is opening more and more pathways for re-inventing how businesses can communicate with their consumers, especially if they’re willing to take a chance.

I’m excited to see how the remaining “big 4” roll out their upcoming campaigns, after all, Barbara will probably have something to say about social media not belonging in “Bank World”.

Check out the NAB YouTube or visit the NAB Twitter page to see the bank’s social media for business efforts.

Yours in social media for business,

Sheri