Tag Archives: Lani Pauli

Pinteresting Brands

 

Earlier this year I came across Pinterest – an online  ‘scrap book’ that lets you organise and share images (and now videos) you find on the web. It instantly appealed to me as a ‘digital hoarder / collector / curator’ as a way to visually organise and display ideas for events, work presentations, home decoration ideas, even destinations I wanted to travel to in future.

As with any new online service the next question and thought that runs through my mind is “How will brands begin to use this?”. I could see there would be certain brands that would fall into Pinterest easily and would be a natural fit amongst the growing online community. Australian stationery brand kikki.K, who was the first brand I noticed using Pinterest, is one such company that was made for a community like Pinterest.

kikki.K was always going to fit in seamlessly. Take a look through Pinterest and you’ll soon see why – if it is twee, crafty, street style, decor or design focused it will be on Pinterest. kikki.K took their product and gave it to a community that was going to adore it (as they do in many other channels already) and opened themselves up to a global audience – many of which are obsessed with “pretty” stationery.

kikki.K owner and founder Kristina Karlsson said the team instantly fell in love with Pinterest’s ease of use and clean visual layout and wants kikki.K’s presence on the site to be visually inspiring, motivating and useful.

“Our brand values are very consistent with Pinterest in that we both are passionate about helping people organise their ideas and inspiration in stylish and creative ways,” she said. “We noticed that Pinterest users were already pinning kikki.K products and styling images to their boards, so it just made sense for us to start contributing to the community and adding to the conversation.”

“Pinterest has given us the opportunity to start building a community around people who share the same passions we do and participate in those spaces in a strikingly visual way. We’ve integrated the Pinterest ‘Follow’ and ‘Pin it’ badges onto our site, to encourage stationery lovers to experience and share our brand in a fresh way. It’s interesting for us to track those products which are being pinned more heavily than others to see which products and interests will rise in this space.”

Brands that could be instantly pinteresting

Like any social media network it isn’t “one size fits all”. Just because everyone is jumping on the Facebook and Twitter bandwagon doesn’t mean your company/brand/business has to as well. It is about what is going to work for you. That’s why for some Pinterest will be the best fit, for others it won’t. So what kind of brands will be a duck to water in the land of Pinterest?

  • Fashion
  • Beauty
  • Homewares / Interior Design
  • Food / Restaurants
  • Graphic design
  • Travel / Tourism
  • Architecture
  • Event service providers (weddings, christenings etc)

Of course, it is still a new online community and is going to be used in many ways. How it is used is up to the individual and the potential is only as good as the idea!

Who else is doing it well?

  • TED. That’s right – TED as in TED Videos. They are using the service to curate examples of Ads Worth Spreading. In a digital sea of ‘pins’ of highly stylised photos, motivational quotes, photos of food, puppies and everything cute it was refreshing to see Pinterest being used in this way.
  • Traveller’s Point – This travel guide is using Pinterest to curate lists of desired destinations and exotic locations.
  • Project82 - hand-selected interior design store

Stay tuned for the next installment where I’ll chat about Pinterest 101 – How to get started and “what is pinning?”

Yours in happy pinning,

Justine.

 

 

TEDxYouth Brisbane

Yesterday I had the pleasure of attending TEDxYouthBrisbane at The Edge. The speakers were diverse and I loved the revised 10min talk format. It kept the pace of the day just right and you never felt like your attention was drifting.

A firm favourite was Harrison Saragossi, a local photographer who was this year named as the Walkley Young Australian Photographic Journalist of the Year  for his work documenting the Valley Nightlife. Harrison’s photos show raw, real and disturbingly human moments in the familiar “Valley Nightclub” right of passage many travel through in Brisbane.

Some of the “sound bytes” I jotted down from the day include:

Lisa Kingsberry
“Push the boundaries when no-one will give you an answer”
“If you can’t do it differently you shouldn’t be in the industry. Always question why you’re doing something.”

Scott Sneddon
“Make something bigger than yourself in a small moment”

Meg Cooper
“I always attract I need. Always be aware of your thoughts.”

And the heartwarming video from Benjamin Zander was a delightful accent to the day:

Yours in TED-inspiration,
Justine.

The Future according to Mike Walsh

Mike Walsh, author of ‘Futuretainment’, presented at a recent AIMIA Brisbane event: “Yesterday the world changed. Now it is your turn” which I attended. For the one-hour session I felt Mike covered a lot of ground, but not once did I feel “overwhelmed” by the information being given to us.

Working in an industry focused on “The Internet” I often find myself disillusioned with the internet and we share a love / hate relationship. When Mike said that we get lost in the “stuff”, the day-to-day routines of our internet patterns and forget the magic of it all I knew what he meant. We do forget the magic of the internet. We focus too greatly on the devices or platforms and forget just what the internet and technology in general can provide us.

I’ve been reading a lot about design thinking and service design lately and Mike’s presentation only further served this area of obsession for me. The most prominent lessons from his talk being:

  • Content is the most important thing. Brands must begin to thinking like media companies – publishers of their own content.
  • Data will very shortly be the most valuable asset a company owns.
  • Your digital behaviour is and will increasingly be an indicator of your likelihood to behave in a certain manner. For example, bank loans in the future will not only take into account your credit history but also things such as Klout rankings.
  • Our jobs as digital marketers is to understand the structure of connected audiences.
  • Gamification is the behavioural logic of how people expect to interact with the world.

Here is a selection of video’s from talks Mike has given.

Yours in futuretainment,

Justine.

Key lessons from Designing for Emotion

I recently read Aarron Walter’s book Designing for Emotion.

Walter is the lead user experience designer for MailChimp where he is the chief responsible for making the online e-mail campaign program’s interfaces more human.

As someone fascinated by the psychology of the things we do, I rushed through this book at an eager pace.

My key lessons from the book include:

  • It is easy in the rush of daily business to build what Walter calls “fast and cheap sites with no reverence for the craft or the relationship we build with our audience.” Take the time to develop a solid strategy before diving into the design just to get a job out the door.
  • Design for humans and the human condition. For example, attention is finite and we are running on low supply. Make it easy for visitors to your website to subconsciously identify patterns and as a result see predictable user behaviour and an ability to retain the information on your site.
  • Give users/visitors freedom and don’t oblige them to fit into a mould. Walter draws upon the example of how Twitter gave users the option to continue using the old interface for as long as it was available. By empowering users of your service to choose for themselves you are automatically changing their tone of their response. This, according to Walter, is companies saying. “You may.. instead of “You must…” You only have to look at the outcries when Facebook makes changes to their interface to see how this works.
  • By employing good design and positive experiences consistently from the start you can build enough of a reputation that when disaster strikes, as it inevitably will, your community will forgive you. Similarly, when disaster strikes be brave and transparent enough to admit to the mistake and ask your community for forgiveness.
  • Know that not every customer, client or viewer of your website is the right fit for your company. It is ‘OK’ to admit this.
  • Make the experience as frictionless as possible. This seems obvious, but as exemplified by this great blog post by Nick Crocker when trying to sign up for The Australian’s paywall service, it is easy to forget that users want the least resistance to the end goal as possible.
Excerpt from Nick Crocker's article "The Australian Shoots Itself In The Foot"

Remember:

We’re not just designing pages. We’re designing human experiences. Like the visionaries of the Arts and Crafts movement, we know that preserving the human touch and showing ourselves in our work isn’t optional: it’s essential” - Aarron Walter

 

You can purchase the book from A Book Apart here as an e-book or hard copy.

Yours in psychology,

Justine.

 

Five ways to use your Instagram photos

Instagram is a photo-sharing app for the iPhone. It has fast become a way to quickly share bits and pieces of your day using preset filters to give various affects to your photos. Aside from how simple it is to use, the beauty of Instagram (in my opinion) lies in how it can make users look at their day-to-day life and surroundings in new light.

But what of your collection of photos? What can you do with them? Check out our five suggestions for bringing your Instagram photos out of your iPhone.

  • StickyGram - lets you print your Instagram photos as magnets, a miniature flip book or poster
  • Casetagram – why not print your photos for your next iPhone case?
  • Instapuzzle – this newly launched iPad app turns your photos in a puzzle
  • Postagram – send real post cards using your Instagram photos
  • Instarium – use your photos for your screensaver

Stay tuned in the coming weeks as I explore how brands are using Instagram.

Yours in photography,

Justine.

 

Brio Talks: MiGoals (Now with added giveaway)

 

Every year around this time or earlier I begin my search for “the perfect diary” for the new year. I’m one of those old-school kids that still prefers to have a paper diary to organise my life. Despite being a digital strategist Google Calendar just doesn’t cut it or beat writing an appointment in my diary. This week I was introduced to MiGoals, the brain child of Adam Jelic, and I instantly loved the simplicity of the diary design. What also had me gravitating towards hitting “Buy Now” for the MiGoals 2012 Diary was the ethos behind the brand.

How often do we start a year, a month or every day with goals in our mind that are never achieved? If we wrote them down and had them right in front of us each day would we take more action? Would we achieve them quicker and with greater conviction? For me personally – yes. Seeing goals written down is a constant reminder for me that brings them front of mind. It also serves as a soft reminder that perhaps I’ve not taken steps to achieve said goals. It keeps me accountable.

I wanted to know a little more about MiGoals and Adam so I sat down for this Q&A with him. Enjoy!

Brio Daily (BD): Where do you gather your inspiration?

Adam Jelic (AJ): I generally gather inspiration from day to day activities such as reading the newspaper, going on Facebook, reading books, listening to music and surfing the internet. These daily activities tend to cover a vast amount of different subjects which in return help me become more aware of what’s happening around me. In most cases I tend to write a few ideas a week in my note book as a result of the above daily activities.

BD: What are you or have you recently read?
AJ: Recently I read Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell and I am in the process of reading The 4-hour Workweek by Tim Ferris. Both books challenge you as a reader to look beyond the status quo of what success is and how and why some achieve it and some don’t. One of the things I am now implementing in my reading is I try to swap categories, so I am not just reading about the same thing, again this helps with getting the balance right and not simply focusing on business and personal development.

BD: What do you think an inspired life should look like?
AJ: In my eyes an inspired life is: someone who is aware of who they are, are driven by their passions, are grateful for what they have, maintain a balance in different aspects of their lives and are doers as opposed to talkers.

BD: What was the idea behind Mi Goals and what have been the biggest challenges launching the site?
AJ: The initial idea for Mi Goals began when, as a young 20-something professional, I found there was a lack of practical tools for goal setting that spoke the language of my generation. After several years of research and product development, our first product Mi Goals diary was created and launched in late 2010.

The belief and logic behind creating Mi Goals diary was to deliver a unique platform and visually appealing product through which one could record and track their daily activities, while measuring the success of their goals.

The biggest challenges in regards to launching the Mi Goals website has been getting it completed and launched on the scheduled date we set. Secondly the look and feel has been another challenge, initially throughout the early stages of design the website was much more content driven and lacked that visual presence. After some more research and feedback we shifted our focus to a more visual and design based website, I guess our real goal was to highlight the products as best we can.

BD: Lastly, how would you like to see Mi Goals develop?
AJ: I would like to see Mi Goals develop into an international market leading lifestyle brand. The exciting thing about Mi Goals is it has the opportunity to develop into so many different industries and markets because people have goals in all areas of their life. In the short term, our goal as a business is to continue to create visually appealing and functional stationery products that inspire and help individuals achieve their goals.  You may see the Mi Goals brand develop and introduce new ways to inspire and help individuals achieve their goals.

 

You can register to be a part of Team Mi Goals and participate in events

 

GIVEAWAY

MiGoals have generously given Brio Daily two (2) MiGoals packs to giveaway to our readers. Each pack contains a 2012 diary and Notes Book.

To enter email lani@briogroup.com.au with ‘MiGoals’ in the subject and let us know: What is the biggest goal you want to achieve in 2012?

Winners will be drawn on Thursday November 4th.

 

You can purchase the MiGoals range via MiGoals | Notemaker or find a stockist in your local area.

Or why not keep up to date on the latest from MiGoals via Twitter | Facebook | MiGoals Blog

If you like Mi Goals you might also enjoy:

You can read more of Adam’s insights on PlanBig | Tips for sticking to New Year’s Resolutions (really this applies to any goals!)

Yours in old-school diaries,

Justine.

 

AND THE WINNERS ARE…..

Congratulations to Damon K and Sally B who are the winners of our MiGoals competition.

The handlettered logo

Somewhere on my travels around the internet last week I stumbled upon this website showcasing the hand-lettered logos from now defunct US department store chains.

I adore the modern script that you can imagine being in the 50s and 60s and not out of place on the next series of Mad Men.

GOLDSMITH’S Memphis, TN. (1946) Founded in 1870, converted to Macy’s in 2005. The logo was designed by Margaret Grace, an employee of the store’s advertising department at the time. The script logo was used in all signage and advertising until the mid-90s, when an all-lower case sans serif font was used.

SAGE ALLEN Hartford, CT. (1970s)
DIAMOND’S Cleveland, OH. Founded in 1860, converted to Dillard’s in 1992.
McALPIN’S Cincinnati, OH Founded in 1852 as Ellis, McAlpin & Co. All McAlpin’s stores were converted to the Dillard’s in 1998.

(Images via Annyas)

Yours in logos,

Justine.

What’s in a manifesto

 

The 99 Percent
99 Percent's thoughts on manifestos

 

A few projects I am currently working on at Brio have got me thinking about manifestos. What is their worth and what makes a great* manifesto?

The manifestos that stick in my mind and are on instant recall are:

Umair Haque’s The Generation M Manifesto

Gen M is about passion, responsibility, authenticity, and challenging yesterday’s way of everything.

Former Brisbane-resident Clare Lancaster’s Women in Business manifesto

LuLuLemon Athletic’s manifesto

Apple’s manifesto for innovation and success

And for those fluent in design, internet and all things aesthetically pleasing you’re bound to have seen or been told about the Holstee Manifesto.

[briotube]http://www.youtube.com/v/qQAzi8q_2LY?[/briotube]

If you fancy printing it out for your home, office or to give to a friend you can, here.

What makes a great manifesto? A few things to consider when you are creating a manifesto:

  • Does it inspire action? A good manifesto should encourage action or change.
  • It should guide your personal or brand intention.
  • Recognise that a manifesto will evolve as you or your brand evolves. Be prepared to reflect upon it regularly to ensure it is always relevant.
  • It doesn’t always have to go public. A manifesto, especially if for yourself, may be something you keep for yourself – a reminder of what you have set out to achieve.

This all begs the questions:

Do you have a favourite manifesto?

Do you have a personal manifesto? Do you think businesses need a manifesto? Are they the new mission and values statements?

Keen to hear your thoughts.

Yours in manifestation,

Justine.

 

*definition of “great” is open to interpretation. Afterall we all like different things, don’t we?

Brio Talks: Beautiful Pages + Giveaway (Updated)

 

 

Beautiful Pages is the newly launched venture of Tiana Vasiljev who, as someone working in the creative industries, always had a self-confessed “out-of-control obsession with books.” When I saw the site I instantly set about making a “wishlist” of books and wanted to know more about how the online store came to be. Tiana was only too happy to answer my questions!
BrioDaily (BD)What was the idea behind Beautiful Pages?

Tiana Vasiljev (TV): Like many creatives, I have always had an out of control obsession with books. A substantial amount of my annual salary over the years was dedicated to purchasing new books and magazines. Beautiful Pages was initially a selection of 75 design books that had inspired me as a graphic designer over the years. They all had a positive and inspiring impact on my work, attitudes and design knowledge. They were books I felt every designer could benefit from having in their design library.

Through Beautiful Pages we wanted to create an online graphic design store where Australian designers (and designers all over the world) could go to be inspired. A creative online space that both students and professionals could visit any time of the day and easily purchase products that would fuel their imagination. We hope Beautiful Pages serves as a reminder to designers about the beauty of real ink on paper, the importance of the printed page and the pleasures and benefits of owning these beautiful books, magazines and printed pieces.

BD: What have been the biggest challenges launching the site?

TV: The biggest challenges with the site were setting up accounts with all our distributors and managing the finances and cash flow. My education is in graphic design so it was a little hard in the beginning juggling other aspects of the business. But I’ve been lucky enough to have some wonderful help along the way and all the orders and emails that keep coming through from designers all over Australia have been amazing and very motivating.

BD: Where do you gather your inspiration? (books, websites, shops, people)?

TV: Just visiting my own design library! Most of the books that are now sold on the website I first became familiar with over my first few years of being a graphic designer – and I have managed to build up quite the collection. There are many publications that I used to read years ago while studying at Enmore TAFE, books and magazines that my previous colleagues introduced me to and publications I have seen and purchased along the way.

I have travelled a great deal over the last few years and also lived in London for a year. I was always visiting galleries, museums, exhibitions and bookstores. I compiled a wish-list (I have over 50 pages now) of all the products I came across during my travels that I found to be either beautiful, beneficial or both. Beautiful Pages is a small (but growing) collection of the products that have turned out to be both.

BD: How do you select what goes onto Beautiful Pages?

TV: Beautiful Pages offers a very carefully curated collection of design books and products, selected by graphic designers – for graphic designers. The store carries a collection of both classic and new publications. Every product on the site needs to be beautiful – but most importantly – must be well written, inspirational and carry an important message.

Typography is a crucial topic in most of the featured publications and we do tend to place special emphasis on (but not limited to) modernist graphic design. Swiss graphic design and typography plays an important part in the collection, as does the work of many influential graphic designers including Alan Fletcher, Otl Aicher, Wim Crouwel, Armin Hofmann, Jan Tschichold, Herbert Spencer, Wolfgang Weingart, Emil Ruder, Josef Muller-Brockmann and Milton Glaser to name just a few.

BD: How important is it to you to promote Australian design and how can we foster a greater design industry?

TV: Our most important long-term goal is to help promote and support Australian design. We have started investing funds into purchasing a range of books and magazines created by Australian designers. These currently include the work of Thursday Design, Michael Hall, The Initiative, David Pidgeon and Half Court Press. We look forward to seeing this collection grow over the coming months and encourage designers to submit their recommendations or published work.

We can all help foster a greater design industry by building ties with like-minded creatives, collaborating on projects and promoting each other. We need to start advertising and exporting Australian work to overseas markets and with the boom in online sales there’s no better time to be doing it than now.

Beautiful Pages is 100% Australian owned and operated. When designers purchase products from our website they are also helping to support the Australian economy.

BD: Lastly, future plans for Beautiful Pages?

TV: We have lots of plans for the future. Our wish list is very long, our product range is expanding every week and we’re aiming to have the full collection up by mid 2012. We are also looking at the possibility of opening a small shop space in late 2012, but this is still at very early stages.

If designers have any requests, suggestions or would like Beautiful Pages to stock their merchandise, please email us: info@beautifulpages.com.au

We look forward to getting to know you over the coming months and hope that through the site we can spark a bit of inspiration and creativity in all of you.

Beautiful Pages: Twitter | Facebook | Website

Giveaway

As a special treat for Brio Daily readers Beautiful Pages are giving away two books by Paul Arden, ‘It’s Not How Good You Are, It’s How Good You Want To Be’ and ‘Whatever You Think, Think The Opposite’

Winners will be chosen at random. To enter, email your name and postal address to lani@briogroup.com.au 

Entries close COB on Tuesday Oct 18, 2011 and open to Australian residents only.

UPDATED

Thank you to everyone who entered our very first competition. I’m delighted to say that two winners have been drawn, at random. We used random.org to randomly generate the winners. Congratulations to Mathew H and Deanna H. We’ll be in touch very shortly!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yours in design inspiration,

Justine.

Monday TED-spiration: Nurturing Creativity

I have a confession. I’ve never read Elizabeth Gilbert’s Eat,Pray, Love. I’ve never had any urge to read her story of finding herself following the breakdown of her marriage. I will confess, I begrudgingly sat through the movie adaptation of the book and it didn’t rate for me. While I can’t explain why I’m yet to be drawn to read Gilbert’s best seller, her TED talk on nurturing creativity is one of my favourite TED talks.

[briotube]http://www.youtube.com/v/86x-u-tz0MA?[/briotube]

What is your fail-safe activity for nurturing your creativity? How do you stay fresh and driven by your ideas?

Yours in creative nurturing,

Justine.