Tag Archives: inspiration

Kid’s know best

How often do you think of something you’d love to do, or a goal you’d be proud to achieve, but you are blocked because you don’t know how? You put it in the too hard basket, because you don’t know where to find the information, training or resources you need.

This little guy, Thomas Suarez, was an inspiration to our team this morning, as we watched this video of his TED talk. He talks about how he approached his goal, to make an iPhone app. Suarez has uploaded two apps to the app store (including the very cool “Bustin Jieber” – a Justin Bieber whack-a-mole) and he’s onto his third!

Very inspiring! If he can do it, so can we!

Yours in learning-from-kids,

Anya

Lose your licence and you’re screwed

Recently I was researching design ideas on the internet for a project. As you can imagine seeing some awesome ideas from someone else can spark off an inspiration in you, which translates into an awesome concept for the project you work on. One of the things that is so great about the internet is that inspiration is so easily accessible and in global sense as well. You discover gems that you would probably never have seen.

So in my researching I came across this great campaign for the Motor Accident Commission (MAC) in South Australia. The campaign is aimed at young drivers and just how ‘screwed’ they’d be, if they lost their licence.

 

mac campaign

 

I am inspired by the quirky humour in this advert. After all as a teenager I couldn’t think of anything worse then being embarrassed by your mum or any of the other situations the adverts play on (eg. trying to pick up girls on bikes, or making out in an expensive taxi). I for one had to laugh at the situations. Even the website is well executed in it’s humour, informing young drivers of the many other ways they’d be ‘screwed’, as well as what actions may cause them to get ‘screwed’. I also like the fact that this isn’t a shock tactics campaign and shows a new approach to target a particular audience. You can check out more about this campaign at www.mac.sa.gov.au/young_drivers/home.

What do you think of this campaign? If you were a young driver do you think you’d stop and take notice?

Yours in inspiring advertising
Dawn

 

What is creativity?

Anyone in the creative industries will know how difficult it can often be describing to someone what you “do” for a living. Being “creative” isn’t easily defined and is not something I think you can learn: you either have it or you don’t. Similarly, the way in which an individual approaches their creativity is a rare and highly personal process.

The video below of Wieden + Kennedy’s John Jay recently did the rounds amongst my creatively minded peers and the executive creative director, recently named as one of the most creative business people in 2011 by Fast Company, talks us through his own creative process.

Watch below to hear more of his thoughts on creativity.

[briotube]http://youtube.com/v/EpfYPVzJohc?[/briotube]

Tell us, what does creativity mean to you?

How do you foster and develop your creativity?

What environments are you most creative in?

Yours in creativity,

Justine

Branded Fashion – inspiration for the design

Teaching branded fashion this semester at Billy Blue has resulted in me uncovering the story and inspiration behind many established and young fashion designers. In particular we discuss the connection behind their design philosophy and how that transfers to their work and builds their brand. One fashion designer that I will explore this week with my students is Aitor Throup and in particular his Goggle Jacket.

Throup is fascinated by anatomy and drawing, which have a big impact on how he designs his clothes. ‘My work is primarily about finding a reason to create or design anything. I am interested in justifying all design features and I avoid gratuitous detailing’ he notes.

His design process is distinct. First he draws characters and then ‘I convert those characters and their defining characteristics into wearable versions of themselves so that any design features are dictated by the character and its relevance to the story. That is where the drawings come in. I don’t believe in decorative values. I believe in origin, process and innovation.’

Aitor is inspired by sport and military clothing and hearing him discuss the design of the Goggle Jacket in this YouTube clip is really inspiring. (ps. keep an eye out for the Fiat 500)

Yours in branded fashion

Belinda

Say it on the Cocktail Typer

The recent agIdeas conference in Melbourne showcased loads of amazing designers from diverse creative backgrounds. One particularly inspirational duo, James Yencken and Leeathon Bellew, patented a little online invention called the ‘Cocktail Typer’. While it’s not an excessively useful tool, it is really awesome. They have set up a board of little cocktail umbrellas and using stop motion animation and some tricky web stuff, they have created an interactive scrolling message display (based on the LED signs). You click on the ‘edit’ umbrella, type anything you like, press ‘play’ and watch your message scroll across the board!

You can try it here.

Yours in creative inspiration,
Anya

When fashion & technology collide: Burberry’s Beijing Show

I’m not someone who you would say is “top of the fashion pack” but it goes without saying that I’m mildly interested in the “catwalk show experience”. I like them and when I’m invited to attend, I go, but I don’t often go out of my way to track them down or view them online.

When I do attend, I often gaze with so much admiration you could be forgiven for thinking I’d just met the love of my life and couldn’t take my eyes off them. I watch patiently, carefully putting together next season’s wardrobe in my mind, vowing to track down the items as soon as they’re released for public consumption. I’m pretty sure I even think at some point while in my fashion trance “I should design clothing for a living”, but then the lights come on and I’m awoken to the fact that I may never find, let alone own some of the beautiful designs I’d just witness sashaying before me. What I do own, however is the experience created by the brand, and that brand memory will be mine forever.

My most recent brand “memory acquisition” is from Burberry. Burberry is a historically British luxury brand whose clothing is unsuitable to the harsh Australian climate (for me) and is too much at odds with my current clothing cycle. However they delivered such an unforgettable brand experience with their recent Beijing Fashion show that I’m now looking at their website, “Liking” them on Facebook and finding them on Twitter – I’m a fan with a huge crush on their April Showers showcase.

So how did they blow my brandless cotton socks off?

Like Lynx who stepped outside the box with their technology-born vixens who fell to earth in London’s Victoria Station, Burberry elevated the catwalk experience with their most fashionably dressed catwalk models bursting into snowflakes (amongst other things) at the Beijing Fashion show, adding a touch of magic, personality and interactivity through new technology to their fashion show experience.

[briotube]http://www.youtube.com/v/P74xmTK6W4Y[/briotube]

This unique twist on the standard catwalk show has created a fresh perception of the brand, in my eyes at least, and inspired my thinking on ways to use technology to create greater interactivity between brands and potential consumers in upcoming campaigns.

Yours in all forms of intertwining design,

Sheri

PS. As it’s ANZAC day please take a moment to pause and reflect on those who sacrificed so much to give us the lives we have now.

Generating creativity

I woke up this morning bursting with blog article ideas – weekend outings, upcoming events, social media trends, mind blowing marketing campaigns – but then I got to work, and the words disappeared like water droplets in the desert.

I was stuck at a creative roadblock and regardless of the subject I started on; I failed to find the flow. I started searching online, frantically trying to find a theme that could inspire readers, inspire creativity and give me a topic all rolled into one. But alas, nothing was found. Until that is, I employed a little technique I learnt during a Copywriting course with Ad School last year.

The technique is easy to learn and simple to perform. All it requires is a piece of paper, pencil, a few words (maybe a dictionary will help) and 100 blank boxes on a page.

So I took a deep breath, opened my dictionary and based on the first word that appeared (pineapple) I started drawing whatever came into my head. For one whole minute I let my stream of consciousness flow, and it was refreshing not to have to get it “right” first time around.  I continued doing this, randomly finding words in the dictionary and drawing whatever idea, thought, or image came into my head until 10 minutes had lapsed.

Until that is, I arrived here, telling everyone about the 100-box technique and how it’s a lifesaver for anyone in need of a creative solution.

In times of creative droughts, how do you find and cultivate your creativity?

Yours in creativity,

Sheri

Sharing is caring: how social media can transform your business

A majority of brands understand the importance of communicating their message clearly to their audience, however the most successful brands are also very aware that as social media continues to bring people together – creating a global village – it’s increasingly important to engage in clear, open, two-way communication.

With this in mind I’d like to introduce Gary Vaynerchuk, who is a perfect example of how engaging consumers (or simply those who share your passions) can lead to brand success.

In 2006, Gary Vaynerchuk created WineLibrary.com, and as part of that The Thunder Show was born – which is part wine advice, part sport commentary and all exuberant personality and passion. He also began searching for ways to engage with people who shared his passions, but  this was all outside of his role running a million dollar wine business. What set him apart was that instead of simply communicating to his audiences, he engaged with them by answering questions and providing instant information. These people in turn began following his online programs, comments and posts, all without prompting by Gary.

So what did he do differently to gain this organic following? Gary cared. He cared enough to cultivate relationships the old fashioned way – by listening, responding and not plugging his services to get something back. He communicated in a real and meaningful way – not simply dictating information to yield a sales result.

Through sharing his passion, Gary has morphed into a social media guru, dispersing priceless advice on the significance of online engagement and more importantly the power of The Thank You Economy. Now, I could explain what it’s all about, but part of Gary’s brilliance is the passion he exudes when discussing the topic.

[briotube]http://www.youtube.com/v/2UkiM3OaHxw[/briotube]

Viewer advisory: This program contains explicit language

Yours in social media for business,

Sheri

Before I die…

I’ve always driven past billboards/ads/posters and eagerly scanned their content for some form of inspiration to bring to my day. But it seems that beer advertisements with half-naked models, realestate billboards with cheesy agents and towering fast food burgers just aren’t cutting it for me. I can’t help but feel like big businesses have lost the ability to communicate to and understand how the everyday man/woman ticks.

Then I came across this project by Candy Chang in New Orleans. Her public art project invites passers by to chalk their own ending to the sentence: “Before I die I want to…” on a disused building in her neighbourhood. The public are invited to share their most intimate or crazy aspirations, inspiring fellow pedestrians to chalk up.

The opportunity to fully voice your opinion uncensored creates a huge opportunity to be completely honest and think deeply about your answer. This got me wondering that, with all the leaps and bounds in social media, are big brands really connecting with their customers and getting honest feedback? The disconnection with using faceless technology to communicate still creates a barrier. What would happen if companies started using such ‘in-your-face’ approaches as this public art project? Would there be a more honest approach with feedback if both parties are face to face and therefore more accountable for their words? I would personally love to walk into a store or management office and write up on their wall my review of their service (a bit extreme maybe, but boy would I feel like I was being heard!).

It could be a reminder to the bosses on the top floors that the decisions they make effect people, the environment and communities, not just dollars and annual figures. Maybe a utopic idea, what do you think?

Yours in thought,
Tara

Designing our environments

Nothing screams “rubbish day” like row upon row of bleak grey bin bags piled along the curb. But what if we could take those boring (and let’s face it, depressing) bin liners and create art from waste, at least until the rubbish collection truck finally makes its way to the front gates or sidewalks?

Well the people of Auckland have done just that with their “Beautify Your City” campaign which aims to prevent the illegal dumping of rubbish in city flowerbeds, as well as making the rubbish placed on sidewalks impressively “disappear” before our eyes. The result of this campaign turned ugly sidewalk displays like this:

…into beautifully hedged CBD pathways and gardens like these:

So as we move towards a more environmentally friendly world, where recycling is encouraged more frequently, it’s nice to see even our unrecyclable waste can be beautified and reused, if only for a short time.

The only question I have now is when will they be coming to Australia so I can stop taking out the rubbish (which is a personal hate chore of mine) and start designing my environment?

Yours in urban design,

Sheri