Category Archives: TEDtalk

Sally Kohn: Don’t like clickbait? Don’t Click. – TEDTalk

In this 4 minute TEDtalk, Sally Kohn, CNN contributor, columnist and pundit, talks about a though provoking topic that concerns everybody – Media – and what we can all do to influence it.

She calls clicking a “public act” that each of us can choose to do or not do to somehow shape what information gets the attention and form the media landscape. She says “Everything we blog, everything we tweet, and everything we click is a public act of making media”, drawing to the point that the Media is no longer controlled by a few powerful elites but by everybody; We are the editors.

In this digital age where everybody gets access to the web, people can choose to be a passive or an assertive contributor. It’s now up to you decide what action you want to take.

Think before you click,
Brio Team

Tim Bernes-Lee: A Magna Carta for the Web – TED TALK

In this enlightening TED talk, Mr. Tim Bernes-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, talks about how far we have gone since the Web was first invented and released to the world in the late eighties.

Since its launch in 1989, 40% of the world is now using the World Wide Web, allowing us to enjoy unlimited access to lots of freely available open data and connectivity. It is a conduit for free speech and connectivity, opening new possibilities for personal and professional gain.

“We love the fact that the Web is open, it allows us to talk, anybody can talk to anybody. It doesn’t matter who we are.”
-Tim Bernes-Lee

He also made sure to remind us about surveillance and security, that there may be people out there that might use and abuse these data.

“We can’t just use the Web; we have to worry about the underlying infrastructure of the whole thing. Is it in fact of a quality that we need?”
-Tim Bernes-Lee

Now with Web in it’s 25th year, Mr. Bernes-Lee invites us to think about what type of Web we want.

Go to www.webat25.org to find out more.

Yours in the Power of Web,
Brio Team

TED Talk – Drew Curtis: How I beat a patent troll

In 1993, while a student in England, Drew Curtis began sending links to his friends. Over time that grew until he founded a website for the links: Fark.com. The site has now grown into one of the largest, and most irreverant, news aggregators on the web.

Drew Curtis tells the story of how he fought a lawsuit from a company that had a patent, “…for the creation and distribution of news releases via email.” Along the way he shares some nutty statistics about the growing legal problem of frivolous patents.

Quotes by Drew Curtis:

“Don’t negotiate with terrorists; patent trolls have done more damage to the United States economy than any domestic or foreign terrorist organization in history, every year.”

“Don’t fight the patent, fight the infringement.”

Yours in patents

Angie Rapisarda

Shilo Shiv Suleman: Using tech to enable dreaming – TED Talk

Has our technology — our cell phones and iPods and cameras — stopped us from dreaming? Young artist Shilo Shiv Suleman says no, as she demos “Khoya,” her new storybook for iPad, which floats us through a magical world in 7 minutes of pure creativity. I found this very interesting.

Shilo Shiv Suleman is an illustrator, storyteller and iPad book creator.

Yours in Magical Storybook Creation
Angie Rapisarda

Kevin Allocca: Why videos go viral

Kevin Allocca is YouTube’s trends manager, and he has deep thoughts about silly web video. In this talk from TEDYouth, he shares the 4 reasons a video goes viral. (This is the first talk posted from an amazing TEDYouth event. Many others will come on line next month as part of our TED-Ed launch.

“In a world where over two days of video get uploaded every minute, only that which is truly unique and unexpected can stand out in the way that [viral videos] have.” (Kevin Allocca)

Yours in going viral,
Tanya

Seth Godin – Tribes. Why they are important to marketing.

There is no doubt that the internet opens up many opportunities for each of us to find and communicate with people that have similar interests to us. Most of us have joined a group, a club, or a forum that we visit regularly to talk about or interact with what we love most.

From a very young age I remember taking part in activities organised by the Fiat Car Club. I have continued to attend regular meetings and outings and enjoy talking about my latest restorations or purchases with others in the club, who share my passion. Where the notion of tribes gets interesting is that my father who drives a rare ‘model’ here in Australia, has extended his passion online and joined a forum where he regularly converses with members from all over the world who own the same car. (he has sourced another more detailed way to feed his passion). The forum is specific with a very narrow target group, but the reward for the time he spends participating is extremely high. Checking in on the forum is now part of his daily ritual.

This is what we need to consider when we are marketing, how do we ‘pull’ the right people to our business? Where they want to connect with us. Are we being specific enough about the target group/s and are we providing information that is helpful, useful or gives people a chance to interact with other people with similar interests?

Seth challenges us in this Ted Talk to consider, that we are now living through a change in the way ideas are communicated, spread and implemented. As marketers we need to rethink the ways we are doing things.

You will enjoy this discussion.

Belinda

Cut

Recent findings from a number of large scale studies of consumers and their habits suggest that less choice equals more sales.

Interestingly, secondary conclusions for this hypothesis suggest that less choice converted to quicker decision processing and therefore greater sale conversion.

Could these findings be due to the time poor nature of consumer habits or that branding and advertising has reached saturation point for consumers and there is now a need for desaturating by keeping it simple.

Take a look at the following link: Sheena Iyengar: How to make choosing easier.

Yours by choice,
Amber van Sloten

The Shared Experience of Absurdity

 

Charlie Todd causes bizarre, hilarious, and unexpected public scenes: Seventy synchronized dancers in storefront windows, “ghostbusters” running through the New York Public Library, and the annual no-pants subway ride. At TEDxBloomington he showed how his group, Improv Everywhere, uses these scenes to bring people together and as I see it make people smile and laugh.

One of the many things I took away from his talk is how as kids we are encouraged to play and nothing is thought of it, but as adults we don’t play as much. I hope this shared experience will not only make you smile, but remind you to put some play into your life.

I also encourage you to check out the Improv Everywhere website. It has videos of all of their missions (as they are described) and all are worth a look. So sit back on this Friday and share a laugh.

Yours in sharing absurdity
Dawn

Kid’s know best

How often do you think of something you’d love to do, or a goal you’d be proud to achieve, but you are blocked because you don’t know how? You put it in the too hard basket, because you don’t know where to find the information, training or resources you need.

This little guy, Thomas Suarez, was an inspiration to our team this morning, as we watched this video of his TED talk. He talks about how he approached his goal, to make an iPhone app. Suarez has uploaded two apps to the app store (including the very cool “Bustin Jieber” – a Justin Bieber whack-a-mole) and he’s onto his third!

Very inspiring! If he can do it, so can we!

Yours in learning-from-kids,

Anya