Category Archives: Facebook

Ajax Social Wipes

Ever tried to get rid of all the old pages and boring brands you’ve ‘liked’ on Facebook, or spam you’ve accumulated on Twitter? Colgate’s social tool called “Ajax Social Wipes” does exactly that, by instantly aggregating all of the pages you’ve ‘liked’ on Facebook, where you can easily (with a single click) get rid of things clogging up your news feed! Meanwhile, over on Twitter, it will actively detect spam that you might have started following, and automatically remove it from existence!

Check it out here: http://ajaxsocialwipes.com/

Created by the guys at VML in Sydney.

Global Digital Statistics 2014

Here’s the 2014 Global Digital Statistics, Stats & Facts SlideShare presentation from the guys at We Are Social. It features digital stats like:

  • 2.5 Billion People are Online
  • 1.8 Billions are on Social Networks
  • Top Social Networks added 135 Million users in 2013
  • Facebook now has 1.184 Billion Users

It may be 183 pages, but well worth the look, grab a cuppa and enjoy!

The magic of communication

With so much technology at our fingertips, the ease in which we communicate is something that many of us take for granted. Our worlds are thrown into chaos and we realise just how dependent we are on technology when our email is down or a mobile phone is lost. Imagine if, until recently, you were unable to communicate freely or effectively. Imagine what social media sites like Facebook and Twitter would mean to you if you were deaf or unable to speak. The new ways in which we communicate are giving people a voice that, until recently, they did not have. We think that’s pretty magical!

Now, more than ever, government organisations and businesses, need to look at how their target audience communicates and ask themselves “is our message being heard? or is it falling on deaf ears?”

Yours in effective communication,
Andrea.

Social Media to the rescue

With so many of us now connected to multiple social media platforms, we are all aware what a powerful marketing tool social media can be. We are now also beginning to realise ways in which we can harness its power to help people.

Social media was a primary source of communication following the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. In disaster situations, after survival, there is a human need to connect. Conventional telephone lines often go down, or are overwhelmed, whilst internet connections are still active and usable. Thus people found they could use networks like twitter or facebook to send warnings, relay and receive information and news updates, ask for help and let friends and family know they were safe.

As a result, many international organisations are now implementing social strategies into emergency management plans. A great example is American Red Cross who have recently partnered with Dell to build a Digital Operations Center. During emergency and disaster situations, the center will analyse and use social conversation to make decisions and organise relief efforts.

One of social media’s greatest strengths is in the ease and speed that information can be disseminated. There is great potential for Government, council and humanitarian organisations to use it to connect with and build resilient communities.

Yours in realising potential,
Andrea

CMO’s Guide to Social Media Sites

The social-media landscape has grown since last year with an additional 5 more communities/platforms added and a quite a few of  them are already booming. So, which social media tools and channels will work best for your business?

This years largest growing community is Pintrest, which reached 10 million monthly visitors in less time than Facebook or Twitter did. It’s demographics include mostly women and it is quite popular in the Midwest. The concept behind Pintrest is that members can post images of whatever is of interest to them. From there, followers can then ‘like’, or ‘repin’ those images, which is then pushed out to their followers. Pintrest is a bit different as it offers a way to reach a group that is not usually considered a part of the ‘digerati’ and can be most useful for brand exposure and driving traffic to your site if your material gets ‘pinned’ by others.

This year, Google launched Google+, which offers some unique ways to interact, including Circles and Hangouts (group video chats) which make customer communication a breeze. Unlike Facebook ‘Likes’, positive ratings on Google+ can influence your brand’s search ranking. This channel has become a “must have” for social marketers, as it has more than 90 million users (though, there are questions about how active they are).

Three other communities that have recently been added to the social media pool are  SlideShare, Quora and Instagram.

SlideShare is similar to YouTube for slide shows. It is a great way to promote your brand / products and communicate with customers, however it is pretty much a one way conversation at this stage.

Quora was founded by two former Facebooker’s and is based on questions for community members to answer. It’s an ideal place to share your expertise as it is a perfect addition to your content marketing efforts.

Instagram is an iPhone app that lets you take photo’s of your products or services, apply interesting effects and share them, which can also be pushed out to your Facebook page and Twitter.

Is it time for you to re-evaluate which social media tools could work for you? Gone are the days where having a Facebook page is the only option. There is a continuing amount of other channels that have different capabilities and purpose, and used together can connect with a massive amount of people. For an analysis of which social medial tools are the latest and greatest, CMO have, for the third consecutive year, turned to 97th Floor, an SEO and Social Media Firm for their perspective of the different social media channels and ones that could definitely be worth your time.

You can view 97th Floors take on 10 Social Network Choices on 2012 CMO’s Guide To The Social Landscape.

Yours in Social Media

Angie Rapisarda

Will you still Facebook when you’re dead?

ifidie is an app hosted by Facebook that allows you to leave a message that will only be published if you die. You install the app, record a video or write a message, then name three trustees from your Facebook friends. After you die, if all three of your trustees agree, the message will be posted on your wall. The app suggests you can leave a proper farewell, reveal a long-kept secret, or tell someone what you really think of them!

So, handy? Or creepy?

 

 

But wait, it gets creepier… ifidie used Facebook and Twitter check-ins to track where people were at certain points in time, and called them with the ominous message that DEATH CAN COME AT ANY TIME. The creepy all-knowing voice knew where they were and told them they must go to ifidie.com. They called thousands of people and not only did this attract media attention, it actually did increase the traffic to their website.

 

 

Yours in taking things too far,

Anya

 

Key lessons from Designing for Emotion

I recently read Aarron Walter’s book Designing for Emotion.

Walter is the lead user experience designer for MailChimp where he is the chief responsible for making the online e-mail campaign program’s interfaces more human.

As someone fascinated by the psychology of the things we do, I rushed through this book at an eager pace.

My key lessons from the book include:

  • It is easy in the rush of daily business to build what Walter calls “fast and cheap sites with no reverence for the craft or the relationship we build with our audience.” Take the time to develop a solid strategy before diving into the design just to get a job out the door.
  • Design for humans and the human condition. For example, attention is finite and we are running on low supply. Make it easy for visitors to your website to subconsciously identify patterns and as a result see predictable user behaviour and an ability to retain the information on your site.
  • Give users/visitors freedom and don’t oblige them to fit into a mould. Walter draws upon the example of how Twitter gave users the option to continue using the old interface for as long as it was available. By empowering users of your service to choose for themselves you are automatically changing their tone of their response. This, according to Walter, is companies saying. “You may.. instead of “You must…” You only have to look at the outcries when Facebook makes changes to their interface to see how this works.
  • By employing good design and positive experiences consistently from the start you can build enough of a reputation that when disaster strikes, as it inevitably will, your community will forgive you. Similarly, when disaster strikes be brave and transparent enough to admit to the mistake and ask your community for forgiveness.
  • Know that not every customer, client or viewer of your website is the right fit for your company. It is ‘OK’ to admit this.
  • Make the experience as frictionless as possible. This seems obvious, but as exemplified by this great blog post by Nick Crocker when trying to sign up for The Australian’s paywall service, it is easy to forget that users want the least resistance to the end goal as possible.
Excerpt from Nick Crocker's article "The Australian Shoots Itself In The Foot"

Remember:

We’re not just designing pages. We’re designing human experiences. Like the visionaries of the Arts and Crafts movement, we know that preserving the human touch and showing ourselves in our work isn’t optional: it’s essential” - Aarron Walter

 

You can purchase the book from A Book Apart here as an e-book or hard copy.

Yours in psychology,

Justine.

 

Spare Ticket announced as AMI National Finalist

Ok shameless plug warning! We’re super excited to see our client Spare Ticket announced as a National Finalist for the Australian Marketing Institute’s Awards for Marketing Excellence in the ‘New Brand’ category. We’re up against some ‘stiff’ competition: Warnie’s underwear brand SpinnersSimplot’s Quorn and Queensland winner Mater Mother’s Private Redland; so fingers crossed!

The awards are a part of the AMI’s two day conference, Focus on the Future, held at the Hilton Sydney from October 19-20. The conference will showcase a number of high profile speakers from Microsoft, Commonwealth Bank, Spreets, Telstra and Nestle, to name a few, bringing together some of the world’s greatest marketing minds.

Will you be going?

Yours in marketing coolness,
Janet

The Rabbit Hole Ideation Cafe opening soon…

I’ve recently stumbled across the Facebook page for a new cafe and it caught my eye. Set to open soon, the West End cafe combines my two great interests: design and coffee. The Rabbit Hole Ideation Cafe will be a space for creative types to meet, share ideas, tackle briefs and brainstorm concepts.

The cafe will provide individual workstations of three varieties:

  • drop in desks for once off visits
  • semi-permanent desks if you go there on a part time basis
  • long term desks, booked per month.

All desks are equipped with power to plug in your laptop, internet connection, but best of all… $2 coffees! And it’s not just any coffee, it’s specialty coffee brewed by champion barista, Tim Adams.

The Rabbit Hole Ideation cafe also includes a board room, which can be booked to meet with clients, brainstorm ideas or collaborate with a team of creatives. The board room will have blank walls and designers will be encouraged to use the walls as a blank canvas to write/draw/scribble their ideas and thoughts.

I love that this new concept cafe is encouraging creativity in Brisbane. Can’t wait for it to open!

Yours in ideas and coffee,

Anya