Category Archives: Digital Marketing

Christmas Stress Relief

It’s called the silly season for a reason, right?

How many times have you been pushed out of the way at the shops this year for some other greedy person to get to the bargains (which you didn’t even want anyway!)?

Is all the stress of thinking about the family getting together on Christmas day causing you to bite your nails back to your knuckles?

If so, here is a nice little site that can bring some relief to you this silly season and make you smile again this Christmas!

www.youbetternotstress.com

Check out some of the ugly holiday sweaters and be glad you don’t have one!

Preview the best holiday movies for people who don’t like holiday movies!

And check out the best predictions for 2012!

It’s all in good fun… enjoy!

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas,

Paul.

Get Organised Online… Evernote

Do you have a scrap book filled with clippings, loose pieces of paper and not really have any idea of where anything is? Or know that you kept ‘that’ clipping for some reason but have no idea where you put it, but it’s in a ‘safe place’.

You’re not alone!

But I recently started using on online system called Evernote. It has an iPad & iPhone app as well so you can take and make notes wherever you are.

So what can it do? On the front page of the Evernote website it describes what it can do as:

1. Capture Everything: Save your ideas, things you like, things you hear, and things you see.
2. Access Anywhere: Evernote works with nearly every computer, phone and mobile device out there.
3. Find Things Fast: Search by keyword, tag or even printed and handwritten text inside images.

Out of those three things, the one that appeals to me most is the third—Find things fast! Evernote allows you to ‘tag’ your notes so you can not only categorise all of your items but you can do keyword searches on everything.

I love that you can add in things like, audio notes, website links, photos, videos, files (in the premium version!) and text notes.

And it’s not only for your personal items, it can be a great tool for business too. I would use it when doing a research for strategies and keep a library of ‘tagged’ items that I can refer to at a later stage. The possibilities are very broad, think a bit laterally and maybe use it to store recipes, website bookmarks, Christmas present ideas and on!

All of the basic functions are available in the free sign-up version. Why not give it a go? Let us know if you have any other useful utilities you use to help organise your life.

Visit evernote.com

Yours in online apps,

Paul.

The Future according to Mike Walsh

Mike Walsh, author of ‘Futuretainment’, presented at a recent AIMIA Brisbane event: “Yesterday the world changed. Now it is your turn” which I attended. For the one-hour session I felt Mike covered a lot of ground, but not once did I feel “overwhelmed” by the information being given to us.

Working in an industry focused on “The Internet” I often find myself disillusioned with the internet and we share a love / hate relationship. When Mike said that we get lost in the “stuff”, the day-to-day routines of our internet patterns and forget the magic of it all I knew what he meant. We do forget the magic of the internet. We focus too greatly on the devices or platforms and forget just what the internet and technology in general can provide us.

I’ve been reading a lot about design thinking and service design lately and Mike’s presentation only further served this area of obsession for me. The most prominent lessons from his talk being:

  • Content is the most important thing. Brands must begin to thinking like media companies – publishers of their own content.
  • Data will very shortly be the most valuable asset a company owns.
  • Your digital behaviour is and will increasingly be an indicator of your likelihood to behave in a certain manner. For example, bank loans in the future will not only take into account your credit history but also things such as Klout rankings.
  • Our jobs as digital marketers is to understand the structure of connected audiences.
  • Gamification is the behavioural logic of how people expect to interact with the world.

Here is a selection of video’s from talks Mike has given.

Yours in futuretainment,

Justine.

Spare Ticket announced as AMI National Finalist

Ok shameless plug warning! We’re super excited to see our client Spare Ticket announced as a National Finalist for the Australian Marketing Institute’s Awards for Marketing Excellence in the ‘New Brand’ category. We’re up against some ‘stiff’ competition: Warnie’s underwear brand SpinnersSimplot’s Quorn and Queensland winner Mater Mother’s Private Redland; so fingers crossed!

The awards are a part of the AMI’s two day conference, Focus on the Future, held at the Hilton Sydney from October 19-20. The conference will showcase a number of high profile speakers from Microsoft, Commonwealth Bank, Spreets, Telstra and Nestle, to name a few, bringing together some of the world’s greatest marketing minds.

Will you be going?

Yours in marketing coolness,
Janet

Brio Reads #1

Welcome to what we hope will become a regular Friday fixture on Brio Daily – Brio Reads. Each day our team stumble upon the cool, quirky, inspirational and creative online. This is our opportunity to share those finds with you. Enjoy!

This week the technology, creative and business worlds lost a true pioneer. Steve Jobs was and shall remain a force to be reckoned with. He was a visionary with the courage and support to make his ideas a reality. One of our favourite Steve Jobs talks is is Stanford College Commencement speech from 2005.

[briotube]http://www.youtube.com/v/D1R-jKKp3NA?[/briotube]

 

Journalist Walt Mossberg tells us about the Steve Jobs he knew

A solid reminder that flash mobs are dead. Ok? | Mumbrella

Coffee turned into a $4 splurge – Debbie Millman on how brands have shaped our times | Fast Company

Cold calling for new business can be like trying to score a first date. Chris Savage shows us how it is done | Wrestling Possums

Dreamworks launch their first personal art publication, Moonshine

In praise of slow, Slow Labs list projects that inspire the art of slow design

And we leave you with this fantastic image by Brisbane-based photographer Damien Bredberg

 

Gruen Planet’s first episode airs tonight

 

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The Gruen Transfer is my favourite show. Hands down. It’s required reading (or watching) for those in our industry and gives the rest of the world an insight into what we advertisers do each day.

So naturally I’m busting with excitement for Gruen Planet which airs tonight on ABC1 at 9pm.

Over an eight-week season Gruen Planet will delve into the world of public relations – the world of ‘spin’ with Gruen Transfer host Wil Anderson and panelists Russel Howcroft and Todd Sampson.

“Persuasion is persuasion,” says Sampson, pointing out that the techniques used in PR and damage control are not dissimilar to those used to persuade consumers to buy a product.

Topics will include a proposal to run an ad during grand final week asserting that footballers should not be role models, the rebranding of Rupert Murdoch and a pitch to persuade Australians they hate the Melbourne Cup.

Tonight’s episode will focus on the political survival of prime minister Julie Gillard, described as ‘The only leader on Earth more besieged than Gaddafi’. The show will look at how she should be repositioned as a political brand but will also cover SABMiller’s acquisition of Fosters to tackle the question: How do you sell Aussie beers that are no longer Aussie? And do brands really need to worry about patriotism?

The last part of the show will ask contestants to come up with a campaign to convince Australians that they should stop expecting our footballers to be role models in the run up to grand final week for the NRL and AFL.

And for those of you miss tonight’s episode: a repeat of the show will air on Thursday at 9.30pm on ABC2 or you can catch-up with iView.

Will you be watching?

Yours in spin,
Janet

Sources: mumbrella.com.ausmh.com.au

New social network to rival Facebook, Twitter and Google

I was reading the Brisbane Courier Mail on Friday and came across this story by Alex Dickinson about “the next big” social network, created right here in Brisbane.

Kondoot – a social network based around live streaming video – was quietly launched last month by a small Brisbane team of young technical programmers and already has users from more than 100 countries signed up, with most interest from the US.

It started out as just an idea last year and has taken a little over a year in the making when a few of them got together to see if it was possible. The tight-lipped technical crew has managed to keep it quiet until now.

Mr Hoad, 24, one of the team’s programmers, said Kondoot was a mash-up of the best features of the major social media websites. “Most of them do only their thing – nobody really covers more than that,” he said. “YouTube, for example, is big into video but the social side is not so good. We add that other dimension.”

The team of 10 who work full-time on the site’s business, legal and IT needs is currently working 18-hour days to develop new features.

Users can “friend” others, just like Facebook, but the main point of difference is the wide range of streaming video options.

Kondoot will allow users to broadcast streaming video from home or work live to the world.

“The video calling and text chatting is there and posting to profiles, but we add another dimension,” Kondoot spokesman Nathan Hoad told The Courier-Mail. “It’s mostly about connecting people and video is just one way to do that. “We think we can make a massive splash in the social media scene.”

Will you make the change to Kondoot?

Yours in social media
Angie Rapisarda

‘Anti-endorsement’ – the clever, new marketing tactic

 

It’s no secret that our world is full of product placement and celebrity endorsement. Brands pay big bucks to have their products interwoven into TV shows and movies and throw wads of cash at celebrities to wear their gear at public events.

Usually things go to plan and the celebrity is a great ambassador for the brand, but when trashy celebrities are seen to be endorsing un-authorised products (read: Jersey Shore), the brands can sometimes get a little cranky.

The new trend of ‘anti-endorsement’ might be a better (and much cheaper) strategy and is starting to rise.

Last year a rival fashion house allegedly sent Jersey Shore’s Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi some Gucci bags—in an effort to make Gucci look bad. Now Abercrombie & Fitch is purportedly pleading with Jersey Shore’s Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino not to wear its clothes. They’re even offering to pay him to back off as they’re worried about ‘significant damage to our image’.

Personally I think this is a genius PR strategy – it costs you next to nothing and gives you maximum impact. But what do you think? Is this a cheap shot?

Yours in PR,
Janet

Gamification: How Games are Transforming Marketing

Gamificiation: introducing the new buzz word for a marketing direction that takes cues from games.  Gamification in its basic form is introducing the mechanics of games and combining them with technology to deliver a unique brand experience for the consumer.

These ideas are starting to be used by savvy marketers as some of the traditional marketing strategies are failing to deliver any return on investment. Consumers are looking for and in many cases expecting a level of reward and more engagement with a brand then they ever have before.

These are the five most commonly used game mechanics, as identified by Gabe Zichermann the author of Game-Based Marketing.

  • Points: Points are everywhere, and they’re often used as a way to denote achievement. Points also measure the user’s achievements in relation to others and work to keep the user motivated for the next reward or level. They can even double as action-related currency.
  • Badges: While badges have their origins in the physical world, Foursquare popularized the digital variety with its oh-so-clever set of real-life merit badges that range from easy (Newbie badges are awarded to users on their first checkin) to nearly-impossible to unlock (it takes 10 movie theater checkins to earn the Zoetrope badge).
  • Levels: Businesses are encouraging mobile users for example to level up and get better discounts for becoming more loyal patrons.
  • Leaderboards: Leaderboards rank users and work to motivate and encourage them to become players. Foursquare started with city-centric leaderboards, but now places the emphasis on ranking users against their friends. Earn a few points for a checkin, and Foursquare will show you which of your friends you’ve flown by on the leaderboard. A great strategy for anyone who is remotely competitive.
  • Challenges: These range from the simple to complex and often involve communal activity or group play.  We have utlised this techniques for our client SpareTicket, where a seller can swap a ticket to say a concert for a challenge.

Isn’t it exciting to be entering an age where communication is only going to be limited by our imagination!

Check out Jesse Schell in this video recored at DICE  last year. It will really give you an idea of where Gamification can take marketing. (skip through to half way for the best bits if you are pushed for time).

Remember Social Media was once a buzz word… today it is a marketing phenomenon that is rapidly expanding and taking a larger slice of even the most conservative businesses marketing budget.

Yours in Gamification.

Belinda

Rebecca MacKinnon – Let’s Take back the Internet

In this powerful talk from TEDGlobal, Rebecca MacKinnon describes the expanding struggle for freedom and control in cyberspace, and asks: How do we design the next phase of the Internet with accountability and freedom at its core, rather than control? She believes the internet is headed for a “Magna Carta” moment when citizens around the world demand that their governments protect free speech and their right to connection.

Rebecca MacKinnon looks at issues of censorship, privacy, free expression and governance (or lack of) in the digital networks, platforms and services on which we are all increasingly dependent.

Yours in the Internet
Angie Rapisarda