Category Archives: Viral Campaigns

Jay-Z Decoded – Book Campaign with Bing Maps

As far as advertising campaigns go this is a great one. Highlighting the power of leverage using a celebrity, the public, technology and innovation.

This is what I love about advertising in todays world – technology gives us creative freedom and allows us to interact with a brand in new and interesting ways.

Yours in creative advertising,

Belinda

Carlsberg Cinema Bikers Stunt

Carlsberg and advertising agency Duval Guillaume put together a brilliant viral commercial, by pulling a prank on unsuspecting movie goers. They filled a cinema with 148 of the baddest biker boys they could find and only left two seats left, smack bang in the middle. The reactions are priceless, as you will see, with some choosing to walk away and others taking their seats. Those who were brave enough to venture through the scary crowd were treated to a spotlight beam, a round of applause and you guessed it a cold bottle of Carlsberg Beer, while the movie screen shows the phrase ‘That calls for a Carlsberg’. The fun campaign has been hugely successful and has had over 7,000,00 hits alone.

The question I pose to you, is would you take a seat if you were faced with this situation?

 

 

Your’s in awesome advertising,
Dawn

Telstra 4G Colour Wave

I recently had the privilege to hear Mark Collis, Director of Brand Creativity and Strategy from Telstra speak about their new 4G Campaign just released. Mark gave us an insight into Telstra’s measured approach to marketing and the importance of striking the right balance between new and old media.  For the 4G launch campaign Mark talked about the importance of understanding the social environment so established a ‘Facebook superusers’ group.

Mark showed us some of the raw footage of the colourful ‘stunt’ of a crowd taking off their coloured t-shirts which was followed by an action packed day of unexpected entertainment around Sydney including the biggest entertainers from the web including Dancing Matt, Rebecca Black and Evolution of Dance.  Key content from the launch day was then shared through an extensive social media network including a dedicated Telstra 4G microsite, Twitter, YouTube and Telstra Blender fan page on Facebook. The aim was to create compelling entertainment that people would communicate through their online channels.

All of this activity was balanced out with a TVC and press advertising.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KECDpQvz2Go

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEM5uCH3uGg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Q6gMAaLm24

Mark said if you have quality content you can put it on any platform, customers are looking for a story.  I think Telstra have delivered that with their new 4G launch.

Yours in advertising,

Belinda

Yellow Bird missing. Ransom note found.

I received a rather ominous email the other day from Yellow Bird Project. If you haven’t heard of them, Yellow Bird Project is an organisation that sells t-shirts that have been designed by an array of indie rock musicians. The profits from the shirts go to the charity of the musician’s choice. Their mascot is a little bird who, until now, has been safely residing across their branded materials. As part of a very cool new campaign to get their Facebook ‘likes’ up, the yellow bird has been abducted. According to the demands of the ransom note, the only way to possible to save his life is to ‘like’ the Facebook page. If they get 10,000 likes, the bird might be spared!

The campaign is supported by a range of ‘have you seen this bird’ and ‘save the bird’ posters.

This online social media campaign is effective because it makes you feel emotionally involved with the situation. Will it work? Well, I liked it.

Yours in online marketing,

Anya

 

Gruen Planet’s first episode airs tonight

 

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The Gruen Transfer is my favourite show. Hands down. It’s required reading (or watching) for those in our industry and gives the rest of the world an insight into what we advertisers do each day.

So naturally I’m busting with excitement for Gruen Planet which airs tonight on ABC1 at 9pm.

Over an eight-week season Gruen Planet will delve into the world of public relations – the world of ‘spin’ with Gruen Transfer host Wil Anderson and panelists Russel Howcroft and Todd Sampson.

“Persuasion is persuasion,” says Sampson, pointing out that the techniques used in PR and damage control are not dissimilar to those used to persuade consumers to buy a product.

Topics will include a proposal to run an ad during grand final week asserting that footballers should not be role models, the rebranding of Rupert Murdoch and a pitch to persuade Australians they hate the Melbourne Cup.

Tonight’s episode will focus on the political survival of prime minister Julie Gillard, described as ‘The only leader on Earth more besieged than Gaddafi’. The show will look at how she should be repositioned as a political brand but will also cover SABMiller’s acquisition of Fosters to tackle the question: How do you sell Aussie beers that are no longer Aussie? And do brands really need to worry about patriotism?

The last part of the show will ask contestants to come up with a campaign to convince Australians that they should stop expecting our footballers to be role models in the run up to grand final week for the NRL and AFL.

And for those of you miss tonight’s episode: a repeat of the show will air on Thursday at 9.30pm on ABC2 or you can catch-up with iView.

Will you be watching?

Yours in spin,
Janet

Sources: mumbrella.com.ausmh.com.au

SmartClinics opens at Westfield Chermside on September 19

I’m impatient, work long hours and not loyal to any particular doctor – I guess I’m fitting right into the Gen-Y stereotype! But seriously, when I need a basic prescription or need some basic medical care I just want to pop in and out of the doctor’s as quickly as possible – and I’d think many working Australians would be much the same (gee, that was a bit ALP wasn’t it…”working Australians”).

This is why I’m excited about SmartClinics – the new medical clinic run by Nurse Practitioners, opening at Westfield Chermside on September 19. Now full disclosure, SmartClinics is a client of ours and we’ve been busily working on their design and advertising in preparation for the launch, but really I can’t wait until it’s open.

I think SmartClinics is going to be a really great service for those of us who are fed up with trying to sneak out during lunch and then suffer the long wait in reception before our 10 minute appointment (although I love the trashy mags, do we really need to spend 45 minutes in the waiting room?). SmartClinics will open from 7am-9pm, 7 days a week – thank you weekend and night trading! Plus the appointments are quick and cheap – only $28 for a basic consultation. Now they just need to come to the south side of Brisbane!

Clinics like this have been operating in the US and UK for quite some time now so I’m not sure what all the fuss is about but obviously some GPs think SmartClinics is a teeny bit controversial…check out this piece on Channel 10

Check them out at www.smartclinics.com.au

Yours in innovative health care,
Janet

Konzertmilch campaign boosts concert and milk sales…genius!

Seriously, stuff like this makes me all gooey…and a bit teary…is it sad that an ad campaign has this effect on me? I just love how this out of the box thinking can boost not one, but two products at the same time. Seriously check it out…

Yours in advertising inspiration,
Janet

New social network to rival Facebook, Twitter and Google

I was reading the Brisbane Courier Mail on Friday and came across this story by Alex Dickinson about “the next big” social network, created right here in Brisbane.

Kondoot – a social network based around live streaming video – was quietly launched last month by a small Brisbane team of young technical programmers and already has users from more than 100 countries signed up, with most interest from the US.

It started out as just an idea last year and has taken a little over a year in the making when a few of them got together to see if it was possible. The tight-lipped technical crew has managed to keep it quiet until now.

Mr Hoad, 24, one of the team’s programmers, said Kondoot was a mash-up of the best features of the major social media websites. “Most of them do only their thing – nobody really covers more than that,” he said. “YouTube, for example, is big into video but the social side is not so good. We add that other dimension.”

The team of 10 who work full-time on the site’s business, legal and IT needs is currently working 18-hour days to develop new features.

Users can “friend” others, just like Facebook, but the main point of difference is the wide range of streaming video options.

Kondoot will allow users to broadcast streaming video from home or work live to the world.

“The video calling and text chatting is there and posting to profiles, but we add another dimension,” Kondoot spokesman Nathan Hoad told The Courier-Mail. “It’s mostly about connecting people and video is just one way to do that. “We think we can make a massive splash in the social media scene.”

Will you make the change to Kondoot?

Yours in social media
Angie Rapisarda

‘Anti-endorsement’ – the clever, new marketing tactic

 

It’s no secret that our world is full of product placement and celebrity endorsement. Brands pay big bucks to have their products interwoven into TV shows and movies and throw wads of cash at celebrities to wear their gear at public events.

Usually things go to plan and the celebrity is a great ambassador for the brand, but when trashy celebrities are seen to be endorsing un-authorised products (read: Jersey Shore), the brands can sometimes get a little cranky.

The new trend of ‘anti-endorsement’ might be a better (and much cheaper) strategy and is starting to rise.

Last year a rival fashion house allegedly sent Jersey Shore’s Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi some Gucci bags—in an effort to make Gucci look bad. Now Abercrombie & Fitch is purportedly pleading with Jersey Shore’s Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino not to wear its clothes. They’re even offering to pay him to back off as they’re worried about ‘significant damage to our image’.

Personally I think this is a genius PR strategy – it costs you next to nothing and gives you maximum impact. But what do you think? Is this a cheap shot?

Yours in PR,
Janet